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Firearms of note and ridicule


rmgill
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31 minutes ago, bojan said:

Idea with plastic ones is that they do not transfer as much heat to the chamber. OTOH, most heat is generated in the barrel due the bullet friction, so...

That's what's strange.  Traditionally, the case helped carry excess heat out of the gun, but Cappy says both the empty polymer cases and the chamber are cool to the touch; apparently more efficient use of propellant produces less waste heat. Hmmm...

Edited by shep854
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3 hours ago, sunday said:

. As the gun on the video has no bipod, that is the NGSW-R, so the M4 replacement.

https://sofrep.com/news/goodbye-m16-m4-and-helloooo-ngsw-r/

So it needs  a bayonet!

How can you have a primary infantry weapon without a bayonet! The bayonet is responsible for an untold numbers of casualties in the last 50 years.... mostly accidently self inflicted while opening rations.

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Put the bayonet ON THE SUPPRESSOR. Yeah baby.......

All this be cool tech but drop it down to .308 rim size and make it 6.5 creedmore. Lemme have the option of training with shitty ass steel case. 

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I'm not sure of this is the right place to post this but here goes. This is a question for our American cousins...

 

I was having an argument in the pub last week about that, in the US you can walk into any Walmart and buy a AR15 but you can't buy a bullet proof vest. Apparently only law enforcement personnel can use them for civilians its illegal. Is this true?

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57 minutes ago, TrustMe said:

I'm not sure of this is the right place to post this but here goes. This is a question for our American cousins...

 

I was having an argument in the pub last week about that, in the US you can walk into any Walmart and buy a AR15 but you can't buy a bullet proof vest. Apparently only law enforcement personnel can use them for civilians its illegal. Is this true?

Wal-Marts stopped selling AR15s years ago. Otherwise, any citizen can buy an AR15-type rifle from a Federal Firearm License holder (ie, a gun store), PROVIDED they are US citizens or meet legal residency requirements, AND pass the background check.  There is no federal restriction on private purchases from an individual; some states and localities have restrictions on firearms transactions, to the tune of roughly 22,000+ laws nationwide.

 Barring local ordnances, there is no restriction on private citizens buying body armor.

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10 hours ago, shep854 said:

Wal-Marts stopped selling AR15s years ago. Otherwise, any citizen can buy an AR15-type rifle from a Federal Firearm License holder (ie, a gun store), PROVIDED they are US citizens or meet legal residency requirements, AND pass the background check.  There is no federal restriction on private purchases from an individual; some states and localities have restrictions on firearms transactions, to the tune of roughly 22,000+ laws nationwide.

 Barring local ordnances, there is no restriction on private citizens buying body armor.

Thanks for clearing that up Shep.

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The main reason civilian body armour is rare is that it's expensive.  It's also bulky and not easily concealed, which makes it harder to steal and resell or wear without attracting law enforcement's attention.  If I understand correctly, in the US Federal law restricts it's use by people convicted of felonies, which would tend to include the kind of people who join gangs.

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On 7/15/2021 at 6:00 AM, shep854 said:

That's what's strange.  Traditionally, the case helped carry excess heat out of the gun, but Cappy says both the empty polymer cases and the chamber are cool to the touch; apparently more efficient use of propellant produces less waste heat. Hmmm...

The burning powder is going to be very much hotter than the chamber, so adding a good heat conductor between them (e.g. brass or steel) can only make things worse and a good insulator can only make things better.

 

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2 hours ago, Adam Peter said:

 

While a bit disappointed in the WASR (I've seen videos where the example had much better accuracy), it pretty much fits the 3+/- MOA standard for AKs.

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That channel just keep on giving excellent content:

 

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1 hour ago, bojan said:

That channel just keep on giving excellent content:

 

Very true.  Being able to include Max and Vlad for commentary gives very good perspective.  And Cousin Harry for giggles...

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  • 1 month later...

 

Spoiled a bit by "fudd lore" about "real sniper" vs "DMR" - while M69 was developed for "real sniper" duty, M76 in practice had same level of accuracy and hence M69 lost the point of existing. Which is why it has pretty short service life.

Whole story goes like this:

In the early '60s it was decided that existing sniper rifles (German WW2 leftovers, Mosins and M53 - M48 with PU scope) no longer meet requirements. So to speed up development in 1967. several of the "top of the line" sniper rifles were acqured - Czech vz.54, Winchester 70 (1963. production, 30-06), M40 (militarized Remington 700, 7.62x51) and French FR-G1 (based on MAS 36, 7.5mm) and 1000 rounds of good quality ammunition per rifle.

Test showed that rifles based on commercial ones (Remington and Winchester) could not only match rifles derived from military service rifles but had a lot of other advantages also. So it was decided to try to make sniper rifle based on Zastava 67 commercial hunting rifle (which was also sold in US via Interarms as "Mark X" rifle). Changes were minor, with larger front handguard, adjustable rear sight and standardized scope mount.

Tests showed accuracy comparable to a other tested rifles and rifle was formally adopted as "Rifle, Sniper, 7.9mm M69" as a company level (intended to have 2 per rifle company) and recce units (intended to have 4 per recce company or 2 per recce platoon) based sniper rifle..

Meanwhile, Zastava was working on 7.62x39mm weapon family that included DMR with 20" barrel. This was to go with a new concept of rifle section, 9-men strong, based on section leader + two identical fireteams with 1 x DMR, 1 x SAW and 2 x AR. However this one was disappointing* - due the 7.62x39mm ammo it could not fulfill accuracy standards @ 600m. Then it was decided (at first as a semi-private initiative by one of the engineers) to scale it up to 7.9mm, and M76 was born. It was tested, showed good accuracy and was adopted.

Then someone stopped and thought "If M76 has comparable accuracy as M69, then why the hell are we making M69 when it has no advantages over M76?" and M69 production stopped.

*Idea was not given up however, first it was trialed for territorial defense, but also rejected and finally refined a bit more and technical documentation sold to Iraq where it became "Tabuk Sniper".

As for M69, years ago, I had one, but w/o scope. Now it is with a brother, since he actually goes hunting at least occasionally, while I only took it maybe once a year to range.

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