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Slate article on the Spitfire


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About the He122B, i read on its performance..

 

max speed 500 km/h (+35 vs Bf-109B)

 

Two MG FF gun + 2x 7,92 mm (Bf-109B: only 2 x 7,92 mm)

 

Better endurance

 

wider undercarriage gear.

 

Really, all this was archivied with only the usual Jumo engine, rougly the same of the Bf-109??

 

But if so, why He-112B wasn't put in production?

 

How is it possible, such superiority over the Bf-109B?

 

Heinkel also failed with He-100 and He-280. While Focke-Wulf managed to ruin the Bf-109 monopoly with the FW-190.

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Heinkel also failed with He-100 and He-280. While Focke-Wulf managed to ruin the Bf-109 monopoly with the FW-190.

And in 1944 when everybody who was anybody wanted to build the Volksjager, it was Heinkel that won the bid to build the He-162.

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Because the He112B wasn't at the competition, it was a post competition developement.

 

 

rightfully so, but this could be said for FW-190.. An He-112B with DB-601 engine, was surely capable to re-open the contest..

 

Maybe the He-112B had not good flying characteristics? Japs, Spanish and other buyed it, but it had not good success either.

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Really, all this was archivied with only the usual Jumo engine, rougly the same of the Bf-109??

 

But if so, why He-112B wasn't put in production?

 

Probably, the figures aren't very representive of armed & fully equipped production fighter. End-users seem to have been somewhat disappointed with actual performance. Romanians flew it off against IAR.80, and the domestic fighter proved much superior to He-112B...

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Probably, the figures aren't very representive of armed & fully equipped production fighter. End-users seem to have been somewhat disappointed with actual performance. Romanians flew it off against IAR.80, and the domestic fighter proved much superior to He-112B...

 

 

Maybe it's true, but i still like the two 20 mm guns of He-112B, the Bf-109B/D was almost unarmed, especially vs medium bombers. The Heinkel should had been really nasty as flying characteristics, if it had almost no success at all.

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  • 11 months later...

As good a thread as any for this - P-40E-1-CU Tomahawk - http://www.worldwarbirdnews.com/

the locals loot it in vid 2

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFe8CsOdoG8&feature=relmfu

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9LsK74J_W0

 

Bet a positive ID can be made from this reference -

http://raf-112-squadron.org/raf_kittyhawK_codes.html

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I'd just like to hear a flying Lancaster in the flesh. Four synchronized Merlins would be even cooler than the two on the Mossie I saw fly.

 

As an air cadet, I visited RAF Lossiemouth when they were still flying Shackleton AEW. Four Griffons...

 

12 Sqn were sharing the base with 9 Sqn (who were flying Buccaneers in the anti-shipping role), and the zap stickers of the time read "eight screws are better than two blow-jobs"...

 

It is said that you watch out if your Griffon runs smoothly or your Merlin rough.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I count myself lucky to have seen a flying Lanchester.

 

Ive not seen one nearly often enough. Its still my favourite WW2 aircraft, and has been since I saw S/Sugar in Hendon in the early 80s.

 

Is it my fevered imagination, or was there talk of getting a second airworthy in Canada?

 

As for seeing a Mozzie fly, thats one I did miss out on. Good case for building some new ones I think.

 

I remember hearing about that too. All I could find about it was this on Wikipedia:

 

Lancaster Mk 10P FM212 was withdrawn from RCAF service in 1962 and placed in storage. The city of Windsor, Ontario purchased the aircraft for use as a memorial and mounted it on a pedestal in Jackson Park in 1965. It was damaged by weather and poor maintenance and replaced by Spitfire and Hurricane replicas on 26 May 2005. Currently being restored by the Canadian Historical Aircraft Association, this Lancaster has been renamed "Bad Penny" to commemorate the first RAF Avro Lancaster into Holland during Operation Manna to save the Dutch from starvation in the closing days of World War II, 29 April 1945.[8] On 29 April 2007 (to coincide with the 62nd anniversary of Operation Manna), FM212 was removed from storage in Jackson Park and towed to the Sears parking lot of Devonshire Mall where it was on display and open for tours through the aircraft. On 13 May 2007, FM212 was towed from Devonshire Mall to Windsor Airport where it is on display and undergoing extensive restoration to return the aircraft back to a flight worthy status over the next few years.

 

And a couple of videos here: http://www.ch2a.ca/MainWelcome.html

Edited by irregularmedic
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  • 8 years later...

There has been a recent programme on British TV called 'The Spitfire Factory', about a restoration facility on the old Biggin Hill airfield. The main focus for the series was the restoration of that very aircraft. They were somewhat blown away by it, because it had original features, including feed trays, you dont normally find in aircraft coming in for restoration. I was amused to note the engine (which again turned out to be the original engine to the airframe) was restored just down the road from me.

 

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5 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

There has been a recent programme on British TV called 'The Spitfire Factory', about a restoration facility on the old Biggin Hill airfield. The main focus for the series was the restoration of that very aircraft. They were somewhat blown away by it, because it had original features, including feed trays, you dont normally find in aircraft coming in for restoration. I was amused to note the engine (which again turned out to be the original engine to the airframe) was restored just down the road from me.

 

Interesting trainer, the rear view mirror was a bit useless except checking the face of the instructor after a manoeuvre.

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