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'Bizarre cow woman' found in Cambridgeshire Anglo-Saxon dig

 

Archaeologists excavating an Anglo-Saxon cemetery in Cambridgeshire say the discovery of a woman buried with a cow is a "genuinely bizarre" find.

The grave was uncovered in Oakington by students from Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Central Lancashire.

At first it was thought the animal skeleton was a horse.

Student Jake Nuttall said: "Male warriors might be buried with horses, but a woman and a cow is new to us."

He added: "We were excited when we thought we had a horse, but realising it was a cow made it even more bizarre."

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Roman jewellery found in ancient Japan tomb

 

http://news.yahoo.co...-163550978.html

" in a sign the empire's influence may have reached the edge of Asia."

Doh! Small items like beads can easily be traded over long distances. It doesn't mean there was any Roman 'influence' on Japan. The Japanese buyers probably had no idea where the beads came from. They'd probably have been imported from China, maybe via Korea, having been traded from the Roman Empire to China via Central Asian intermediaries. Or maybe they went the sea route, to India, then on to SE Asia, then up to Japan. Whatever, they'd have been through multiple hands en route.

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ATHENS, Greece — Two Roman-era shipwrecks have been found in deep water off a western Greek island, challenging the conventional theory that ancient shipmasters stuck to coastal routes rather than risking the open sea, an official said Tuesday.

 

How else would they have got from Italy to Greece? We know they sailed direct from southern Italy to Greece, east across the open sea. It's well documented. We have accounts of people travelling overland from central or northern Italy the SE to take ship for Greece. West of Corfu is pretty close to the shortest open sea route.

 

Coasting would have meant sailing all the way round the Adriatic.

 

They're among the deepest found because wrecks in shallow water are easier to find. Survey the bottom between Corfu & Puglia & you'll probably find huge numbers of wrecks, just like between Sicily & Tunisia

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We had a dragger bring up a 2,000 year old chinese vase in the Strait of Juan De Fuca. Problem is we don't know if it came off a 14th century Chinese Junk or a 19th century Brig. We have had Japanese and Chinese stuff turn up in digs of Indian villages here. Not surprising given the currents.

Edited by Colin
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We had a dragger bring up a 2,000 year old chinese vase in the Strait of Juan De Fuca. Problem is we don't know if it came off a 14th century Chinese Junk or a 19th century Brig. We have had Japanese and Chinese stuff turn up in digs of Indian villages here. Not surprising given the currents.

 

Things appear in the strangest places. There are areas of NYC that are built on London rubble from the Blitz, which were brought as ship ballast during the war. I bet there are many such surprises for archaeologists!

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Roman jewellery found in ancient Japan tomb

 

http://news.yahoo.co...-163550978.html

" in a sign the empire's influence may have reached the edge of Asia."

Doh! Small items like beads can easily be traded over long distances. It doesn't mean there was any Roman 'influence' on Japan. The Japanese buyers probably had no idea where the beads came from. They'd probably have been imported from China, maybe via Korea, having been traded from the Roman Empire to China via Central Asian intermediaries. Or maybe they went the sea route, to India, then on to SE Asia, then up to Japan. Whatever, they'd have been through multiple hands en route.

 

I agree:

Tests have revealed three glass beads discovered in the Fifth Century "Utsukushi" burial mound in Nagaoka, near Kyoto, were probably made some time between the first and the fourth century, the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties said.

Plenty of time for a leisurely trip across the globe

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  • 2 weeks later...
4 July 2012 Last updated at 16:17 GMT

 

Hidden Doggerland underworld uncovered in North Sea

 

 

A map of the UK with Doggerland marked as red

 

A huge area of land which was swallowed up into the North Sea thousands of years ago has been recreated and put on display by scientists.

 

Doggerland was an area between Northern Scotland, Denmark and the Channel Islands.

 

It was believed to have been home to tens of thousands of people before it disappeared underwater.

 

Now its history has been pieced together by artefacts recovered from the seabed and displayed in London.

 

The 15-year-project has involved St Andrews, Dundee and Aberdeen universities.

 

The results are on display at the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition in London until 8 July.

 

The story behind Doggerland, a land that was slowly submerged by water between 18,000 BC and 5,500 BC, has been organised by Dr Richard Bates at St Andrews University.

 

Dr Bates, a geophysicist, said "Doggerland was the real heartland of Europe until sea levels rose to give us the UK coastline of today.

 

"We have speculated for years on the lost land's existence from bones dredged by fishermen all over the North Sea, but it's only since working with oil companies in the last few years that we have been able to re-create what this lost land looked like.

 

[...]

 

The research team is currently investigating more evidence of human behaviour, including possible human burial sites, intriguing standing stones and a mass mammoth grave.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...t-fife-18687504

 

Iä, Iä, etc.

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The Doggerland hypothesis seems to indicate that European culture got out of the Stone Ages and began development only after it was safely moated from the English, Welsh, Irish, and Scots. ^_^

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EDMONTON - A dinosaur skeleton found near Grande Prairie last month has been destroyed “by human hands,” scientists say.

The Hadrosaur skeleton was discovered by paleontologists on June 15 but was reburied to protect the fossils until they could be safely removed.

When Dr. Phil Bell arrived to move the fossil, he found the remains in ruins.

“They’d gone through and smashed indiscriminately,” Bell, a project paleontologist with the Pipestone Creek Dinosaur Initiative, said in a news release. “It’s an irreplaceable loss.”

 

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/technology/Priceless+skeleton+destroyed+latest+fossil+attack/6896947/story.html

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A Canadian archeologist who excavated the remains of a 500-year-old First Nations settlement near Toronto has revealed a stunning discovery: a carefully buried, European-made metal object that somehow reached the 16th-century Huron village nearly 100 years before the documented arrival of any white man in the Lake Ontario region.

 

The unearthing of what appears to be part of a wrought-iron axe head at the so-called "Mantle" archeological site in present-day Whitchurch-Stouffville, Ont. - a fast-growing suburb about 40 kilometres east of Toronto - is showcased in a new documentary film, titled Curse of the Axe, to be screened for the first time Monday at the Royal Ontario Museum and broadcast nationwide July 9 on History Television.

 

http://www.sott.net/articles/show/247137-Scrap-of-European-iron-found-creates-500-year-old-Canadian-mystery

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The meadows of Alken are thick with ancient skeletons. At least two hundred have already been unearthed – and there are many waiting to be discovered. An entire army was sacrificed around the time of the birth of Christ and laid to rest in the Alken bog. Now archaeologists and other experts are working to shed light on this dramatic event.

 

What exactly happened in the Danish village of Alken around the time of the birth of Christ? Who were the over two hundred victims, and what events led to such an enormous sacrifice?

 

 

http://www.heritaged...ficed-in-a-bog/

 

Life imitates art. Art imitates life.

 

Edited by X-Files
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Today New York City is the Big Apple of the Northeast but new research reveals that 500 years ago, at a time when Europeans were just beginning to visit the New World, a settlement on the north shore of Lake Ontario, in Canada, was the biggest, most complex, cosmopolitan place in the region.

Occupied between roughly A.D. 1500 and 1530, the so-called Mantle site was settled by the Wendat (Huron). Excavations at the site, between 2003 and 2005, have uncovered its 98 longhouses, a palisade of three rows (a fence made of heavy wooden stakes and used for defense) and about 200,000 artifacts. Dozens of examples of art have been unearthed showing haunting human faces and depictions of animals, with analysis ongoing.

 

 

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/ancient-york-city-canada-discovered-141209740.html

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