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Hah! Beat me to it. 

Now I'm curious about the locations, given the realities of Iron Age warfare; water wells, visibility, etc. The Romans thoroughly thought through (isn't that a weird sequence of English words) a lot of stuff. 

 

 

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5,000-year-old mass grave of fallen warriors in Spain shows evidence of 'sophisticated' warfare

A new analysis of a mass grave from Neolithic Spain reveals that the site wasn't a burial ground from a massacre, but of fallen warriors.

Over 5,000 years ago, men, women and children with head trauma and arrow wounds were buried in a mass grave in Spain. Now, archaeologists have teased apart this tangled web of skeletons, revealing new evidence of ancient warfare, a new study finds.

The San Juan ante Portam Latinam (SJAPL) rock shelter, located in the town of Laguardia in northern Spain, was first excavated in 1991. More than 300 skeletons, radiocarbon-dated to 3380 to 3000 B.C., were found in one mass burial, many of them interwoven and in odd positions. Excavators also discovered dozens of flint arrowheads and blades, along with stone axes and personal ornaments.

Researchers initially concluded that they'd found evidence of a Neolithic massacre. But a new analysis of the SJAPL skeletons has revealed that these people were most likely killed in separate raids or battles over a period of several months or years.

https://www.livescience.com/archaeology/5000-year-old-mass-grave-of-fallen-warriors-in-spain-shows-evidence-of-sophisticated-warfare?fbclid=IwAR21ZvQO18Pc5MtxDF_0JmpMdwZfO1AMlSymgtA9ey50B5mmAzX_DU7x3mg

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On 11/20/2023 at 12:08 PM, JWB said:

"Dr Rey’s team worked on a theory that, unlike distance where numbers keep going, the Sumerian system worked more like time on a clock, getting so far before the measuring began again.  The ancient architectural plan would therefore be divided into repeating fractions of distance."

image.png

 

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2 hours ago, Ivanhoe said:

Of course, the Sumerians get nothing but ridicule for their sexagesimal measuring numeral system, vice metric decimal. 

Then we went to binary, octal and hexadecimal...

@Ivanhoe, I think I must beg forgiveness for this display of pedantry, however.

 

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4 hours ago, sunday said:

Then we went to binary, octal and hexadecimal...

@Ivanhoe, I think I must beg forgiveness for this display of pedantry, however.

 

Incorrect pedantry. They used their sexagesimal system for measuring, not just counting.

 

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6 hours ago, Ivanhoe said:

Incorrect pedantry. They used their sexagesimal system for measuring, not just counting.

 

Of course people use numeral systems for measuring quantifiable magnitudes, so correct pedantry 😋

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https://www.sciencealert.com/cluster-of-ancient-lost-cities-in-the-amazon-is-the-largest-ever-found
 

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Researchers have detected a cluster of lost 2,500-year-old cities at the foothills of the Andes in the Amazon rainforest.

This amazing discovery, the oldest and largest of its kind in the region, includes a vast system of farmland and roads, revealing that Ecuador's Upano Valley was densely populated from about 500 BCE to between 300 and 600 CE.

Led by French National Center for Scientific Research archaeologist Stéphen Rostain, a multi-national team analyzed data from more than two decades of interdisciplinary research in the region, recently expanded by light detection and ranging (LIDAR) mapping.

Covering an area of 300-square-kilometers (115-square-miles), LIDAR mapped platforms, plazas, and streets arranged in a geometric pattern, interwoven with agricultural drainage, terraces, and incredibly long, straight roads that connected a number of urban sites.

 

 

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Vesuvius Challenge winners announced fo 2023, new Challenge for 2024

https://scrollprize.org/grandprize

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In the 18th century the scrolls were discovered. More than 800 of them are now stored in a library in Naples, Italy; these lumps of carbonized ash cannot be opened without severely damaging them. But how can we read them if they remain rolled up?

 

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