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Corinthian

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We have a weird news thread, stupid criminals thread, all things obama threads, a space thread, can we have a thread devoted to archaeology news and developments? :)

 

The stuff DADI posted at another thread got me wanting for more. :D

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Sorry about that, I didnt notice it was 4 on demand who uploaded it. This hopefully should work ok.

http://www.dailymoti...-sho_shortfilms

 

Sorta along the same lines, When I visited Marsh in 2006 he took me around his neighborhood and showed me where a bunch of V1 and V2 hit. There was a V2 hit on street where he lives and it took out the whole building and was never rebuilt. Looks like a park now.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Archaeologists in York have traced the violent death of an Iron Age man, after finding his preserved brain -- the oldest of its kind in Britain -- during a dig in 2008.

 

Researchers found the skull amongst a treasure trove of 2,500-year old goodies from a pit, which was being excavated a year before the new University of York campus was built. The site appeared to be a pre-Roman settlement with ditches, walkways and areas for houses and water storage.

 

But the most exciting find was a skull, submerged in mud, that still had a yellowy-brown, shriveled and slightly shrunken brain inside. The York Archaeological Trust's Rachel Cubitt noticed something moving inside the soil-covered skull while she cleaned it. Once she peered inside, and caught sight of the yellow substance, she sealed it up and took the skull to York Hospital for a scan.

 

http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2011-03/29/iron-age-brain

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Archaeologists in York have traced the violent death of an Iron Age man, after finding his preserved brain -- the oldest of its kind in Britain -- during a dig in 2008.

 

Researchers found the skull amongst a treasure trove of 2,500-year old goodies from a pit, which was being excavated a year before the new University of York campus was built. The site appeared to be a pre-Roman settlement with ditches, walkways and areas for houses and water storage.

 

But the most exciting find was a skull, submerged in mud, that still had a yellowy-brown, shriveled and slightly shrunken brain inside. The York Archaeological Trust's Rachel Cubitt noticed something moving inside the soil-covered skull while she cleaned it. Once she peered inside, and caught sight of the yellow substance, she sealed it up and took the skull to York Hospital for a scan.

 

http://www.wired.co..../iron-age-brain

 

How about that NHS! 2500 years ago and still covered. :lol:

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But the most exciting find was a skull, submerged in mud, that still had a yellowy-brown, shriveled and slightly shrunken brain inside.

 

I can't believe no one has made a crack about Man U fans...

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http://www.nationalpost.com/Jordan+fights+return+Dead+Scrolls/4522597/story.html

 

A British team of archaeologists last week announced the discovery of a hoard of ancient texts that they claim could have been written by contemporaries of Christ and whose existence is hinted at in the Bible's Book of Revelation.

 

Cast in lead and copper, the sealed texts, known as codices, have already become the subject of intrigue worthy of an Indiana Jones film. Stories of subterfuge abound, with at least one of the British archaeologists reportedly facing death threats for trying to rescue the artefacts from privateers intent on breaking them up to sell on the black market.

 

Other experts, meanwhile, have dismissed the codices as an elaborate hoax and the British team, led by David Elkington, an Egyptologist, and his wife Jennifer, as gullible hucksters.

 

But the Jordanian government, which has backed the Elkingtons' work, has stated that the codices are an invaluable piece of world heritage at least on a par with the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Jewish texts found in an Israeli cave in 1947.

 

"They will really match, and perhaps be more significant, than the Dead Sea Scrolls," Ziad al-Saad, the director of Jordan's department of antiquities, told the BBC. He said they could be "the most important discovery in the history of archaeology".

 

Here's the fun part;

 

Containing messages in Hebrew and Ancient Greek, the codices were etched in code.

 

That's got Dan Brown written all over it...

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....

Im sure its nothing like that of course. :)

 

 

This is quite interesting, some documents on the stabilization effort to prevent the collapse of Silbury Hill near Avebury.

http://www.english-h...eology/silbury/

 

Wasn't Silbury a relay point between 3 separate sites so as to synchronize their ceremonies, you know sacrifice the virgins an all that.... :D

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I could have found this thread alot faster if someone had spelled correctly. <_<

 

CAIRO – Archaeologists unearthed one of the largest statues found to date of a powerful ancient Egyptian pharaoh at his mortuary temple in the southern city of Luxor, the country's antiquities authority announced Tuesday.

The 13 meter (42 foot) tall statue of Amenhotep III was one of a pair that flanked the northern entrance to the grand funerary temple on the west bank of the Nile that is currently the focus of a major excavation.

The statue consists of seven large quartzite blocks and still lacks a head and was actually first discovered in the 1928 and then rehidden, according to the press release from the country's antiquities authority. Archaeologists expect to find its twin in the next digging season.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110426/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_egypt_antiquities

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The 13 meter (42 foot) tall statue of Amenhotep III

<snip>

and still lacks a head and was actually first discovered in the 1928 and then rehidden, according to the press release from the country's antiquities authority. Archaeologists expect to find its twin in the next digging season.

 

:blink:

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Thanks to 3D mapping, archaeologists have found the ancient Mayan city of Holtun, or Head of Stone. It's been long known that something was there but because of centuries of jungle covering the area, it was nearly impossible to know exactly what it was. The 3D topographical map effectively 'erased' the rain forest growth and revealed a pyramid, an astronomical observatory, a ritual ball court, numerous plazas, and hundreds of buildings.

 

http://uk.gizmodo.com/5796404/lost-mayan-city-found-hidden-under-the-jungle

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  • 4 weeks later...

Scientists at the University of Alabama also found 3,000 ancient settlements using a new technique of infra-red imaging.

 

The astonishing results have been confirmed by archaeologists with picks and shovels, who have located two of the pyramids found from space.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/egypt/8535571/17-lost-pyramids-found-by-satellite.html

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and archeologists have theories like they have assholes)

 

I suppose I am right in inferring that in your view archaeologists have one opinion apiece.

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Ah, but using theirs as a mouthpiece is an entirely different paradigm. As it becomes clear this was your hidden meaning, I gracefully concede to you.

Edited by mnm
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Ancient site of human activity discovered in Eastern Ontario

 

Dig reveals thousands of stone items at what was once a hunting camp along South Nation River

 

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/technology/Ancient+site+human+activity+discovered+Eastern+Ontario/4859581/story.html#ixzz1NsbJcKKP

 

This is just down the road from T19s place. :D

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Ancient site of human activity discovered in Eastern Ontario

 

Dig reveals thousands of stone items at what was once a hunting camp along South Nation River

 

Read more: http://www.ottawacitizen.com/technology/Ancient+site+human+activity+discovered+Eastern+Ontario/4859581/story.html#ixzz1NsbJcKKP

 

This is just down the road from T19s place. :D

 

Damn plant covered what should've been a gratuitous cleavage shot.... :angry:

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Researchers found a tunnel under the Temple of the Snake in the pre-Hispanic city of Teotihuacan, about 28 miles northeast of Mexico City. The tunnel had apparently been sealed off around 1,800 years ago.

 

Researchers of Mexico's National University made the finding with a radar device. Closer study revealed a "representation of the underworld," in the words of archaeologist Sergio Gomez Chavez, of Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History.

 

Experts found "a route of symbols, whose conclusion appears to lie in the funeral chambers at the end of the tunnel."

 

The structure is 15 yards beneath the ground, and it runs eastwards. It is about 130 yards long.

 

http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-05-tunnel-temple-mexico.html

 

Post your From Dusk Til Dawn quips below.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Quang Ngai, Vietnam (CNN) -- Nestled in the mountain foothills of a remote province in central Vietnam, one of the country's most important archaeological discoveries in a century has recently come to light. After five years of exploration and excavation, a team of archaeologists has uncovered a 127-kilometer (79-mile) wall -- which locals have called "Vietnam's Great Wall."

Professor Phan Huy Lê, president of the Vietnam Association of Historians, said: "This is the longest monument in Southeast Asia." The wall is built of alternating sections of stone and earth, with some sections reaching a height of up to four meters.

 

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/asiapcf/01/25/vietnam.wall/index.html?iref=obinsite

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Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs were among the delicacies enjoyed by ordinary Romans, British archaeologists have revealed after discovering a giant septic tank at one of the ancient cities destroyed by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius.

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/8575243/Dormice-sea-urchins-and-fresh-figs-the-Roman-diet-revealed.html

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Page me when they find this...

 

 

 

 

Wrong one. Besides, they found it in 1928.

 

It's under a mountain somewhere in USAF control. ;)

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Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs were among the delicacies enjoyed by ordinary Romans.

 

:blink:

 

I had to go look that up....

 

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edible_dormouse

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=an3uh9_IubE&feature=related

Edited by rmgill
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