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Corinthian

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Got a new grill for Christmas, so today I de-virgined it. Stoked the firebox with mesquite, added charcoal in the main part for the chicken. Cooked Chicken breasts, Chicken wings, pork chops (boneless butterfly), ribs, hot dogs for the kids. Had the in laws over, little food left. Used by Dr. Pepper glaze on the meats....mmmmmnice...

 

Dr. pepper glaze:

 

2 cans Dr. Pepper reduced to 1/4 or 1/8 till it starts getting to just a syrup.

4 teaspoons of tomato paste

2 tablespoons of garlic powder

1 tablespoon of onion salt

4-8 good shakes of worchestershire sauce

1 teaspoon of chili powder

4 teaspoons of soy sauce

1/2 capful of white vinegar

 

Heat to a boil, then IMMEDIATELY remove from heat. Use on pork or beef products

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Got a new grill for Christmas, so today I de-virgined it. Stoked the firebox with mesquite, added charcoal in the main part for the chicken. Cooked Chicken breasts, Chicken wings, pork chops (boneless butterfly), ribs, hot dogs for the kids. Had the in laws over, little food left. Used by Dr. Pepper glaze on the meats....mmmmmnice...

 

Dr. pepper glaze:

 

2 cans Dr. Pepper reduced to 1/4 or 1/8 till it starts getting to just a syrup.

4 teaspoons of tomato paste

2 tablespoons of garlic powder

1 tablespoon of onion salt

4-8 good shakes of worchestershire sauce

1 teaspoon of chili powder

4 teaspoons of soy sauce

1/2 capful of white vinegar

 

Heat to a boil, then IMMEDIATELY remove from heat. Use on pork or beef products

 

Sounds absolutely amazing.

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I'm sure it tastes even better!

 

LOL.

 

Acids to break down the meat, sugars to caramelize and glaze, and damn if there is anything outside of cold beer that tastes better than Dr. Pepper.

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  • 1 month later...

New article supposedly featuring the 7 best US cities for BBQ:

 

http://travel.usnews...est_BBQ_Cities/

 

I fancy myself as somewhat of a BBQ afficianado and there is NO WAY one can compare eastern/southern BBQ (usually pulled pork, ribs) with BBQ found in Texas and west of Texas (usually beef brisket, but pork ribs, sausage, smoked turkey etc. are usually also a part of the menu). Also, eastern/southern BBQ is usually smoked over hickory or oak fires while BBQ west of Arkansas is usually done using mesquite wood - resulting in two distinct types of flavors.

 

Comparing two vastly different styles of food preparation and labeleing them "BBQ" does nobody any sort of justice. But, the article is a fun read.

 

Brief discussion on varying types of BBQ by region:

 

http://www.lifeintheusa.com/food/barbecue.htm

 

Brief discussion on varying types of BBQ sauces by region:

 

http://www.bbq-sauces.com/

 

Brief discussion on varying types of wood used to smoke the meats served in BBQ joints:

 

http://www.smoking-m...ecue-woods.html

Edited by Rocky Davis
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New article supposedly featuring the 7 best US cities for BBQ: http://travel.usnews...est_BBQ_Cities/ I fancy myself as somewhat of a BBQ afficianado and there is NO WAY one can compare eastern/southern BBQ (usually pulled pork, ribs) with BBQ found in Texas and west of Texas (usually beef brisket, but pork ribs, sausage, smoked turkey etc. are usually also a part of the menu). Also, eastern/southern BBQ is usually smoked over hickory or oak fires while BBQ west of Arkansas is usually done using mesquite wood - resulting in two distinct types of flavors. Comparing two vastly different styles of food preparation and labeleing them "BBQ" does nobody any sort of justice. But, the article is a fun read.

Missing from that list is what I believe is the best BBQ place I've ever patronized, Hard 8 BBQ in Stephenville. I've been to Rudy's and Pigs on Beale, have partaken in the BBQ pleasures of the Carolinas, Nashville, aforementioned Memphis, STL, KC, Tulsa, OKC, and a few places in the LA basin and the only time I've ever had dinner or lunch and then went back for take home was at Hard 8. Of course maybe it was the idea of the 90 mile drive that influenced getting what I could when I could.

 

Rocky, you don't have to drive to Stephenville if your appetite demands sampling their fare, I understand there is another in your neck of the woods just north of DFW. I haven't been there yet but I'm sure to go now that I can get great BBQ only 60 miles away.

 

On another note, can't do Dr Pepper in my sauce or marinade, I stick exclusively to Shiner Dark Lager. When Mary was signing about a spoonful of sugar helping the medicine go down, she had Dr Pepper in mind. As for the wood...I like the subtlety of pecan and apple. I'll do oak in a pinch, Hickory would be third on my list, but mesquite I find too harsh.

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For the wood, I primarily use mesquite. 2nd place is pecan (and why not - I have 8 very mature pecan trees on my lot).

 

Here is Texas Monthly's "Top 50" BBQ joints in the state:

 

http://www.texasmonthly.com/bbq/top50

 

Now, we narrow the search even further to "D" Magazine's top BBQ picks in the Dallas area:

 

http://directory.dmagazine.com/restaurants/?awardsSearchKeys_mv=Best+Barbecue

 

BUT, some of the best BBQ in Texas is not sold at restaurants - it is sold at Mom and Pop gas stations and convenience stores (lots of times WAY off the beaten path or in the middle of nowhere).

Edited by Rocky Davis
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My customer in Dallas took us out to Hard 8 one day for lunch. It was fantastic, made me realize just how much I was going to have to up my game when it came to brisket. It also made me very thankful that our Indian co-worker was not a vegetarian.

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My customer in Dallas took us out to Hard 8 one day for lunch. It was fantastic, made me realize just how much I was going to have to up my game when it came to brisket. It also made me very thankful that our Indian co-worker was not a vegetarian.

 

The Dallas area does have some great BBQ joints. I’m surprised that more didn’t make it to these “Best Of” lists. The only one on any of the lists that I have visited is Sonny Bryan’s (legendary since 1958) at it’s original location near Love Field airport:

 

http://www.sonnybryans.com/our-story.html

 

I have three BBQ joints within one mile of my Arlington home: Double-D BBQ, Coker’s BBQ and David’s BBQ:

 

http://www.davidsbarbecue.com/story.html

 

I normally frequent David’s, if I don’t smoke my own brisket. (Edited to add: David is related to Sonny Bryan - compare the two links. Recipes are the same at both BBQ joints).

 

My point is not that Texas BBQ is any better than the places they mention in St. Louis, or Memphis, or Kansas City. My point is that comparing them against each other is like comparing TexMex Mexican food to the type of food served in Mexico City or in Los Angeles – they are all too different to be able to be fairly compared.

Edited by Rocky Davis
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KC has some pretty good BBQ as well.

 

I've heard lots of good things about it, too. I heard they do beef and pork just about equally, whereas Arkansas leans morer towards pork than beef and Texas leans morre towards beef than pork. I've (supposedly) had "KC-style" pork ribs at Tony Roma's. I thought they (and the sauce) was pretty good. What I can't handle is sauces that are sweet with honey or mustard-based sauces instead of tomato-based sauces.

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  • 1 month later...

Couple tips for barbecuing quickly: If you want coals with a quickness, use the exhaust port on a vacuum cleaner as a blower to get oxygen into the bottom of your chosen implement of barbecue destruction. Or, if you've got access to a charcoal "chimney", direct the airflow into the bottom. You'll have full-on coals most quickly, but be careful that you don't go too far, and convert your barbecue into a forge.

 

The other tip? If you haven't tried one of the Kamado-style barbecues, you're missing out. Think of a Weber, but with a clay body instead of metal. You can get the temps up high enough inside one to easily replicate a wood-fired pizza oven, and with some work, learn how to do that. I finally broke down and bought one from Costco, and the product is amazing. Steak done on one of these is incredible--You sear the hell out of the meat for about three minutes a side at 650-700 degrees, and then let the meat rest, and take it down to 350 to cook for about ten minutes. Amazing results--I managed to turn a cheap pair of top round steaks into something sublime, using this thing and a nice Balsamic marinade. I'm a Kamodo believer, now. If you want to make your mouth water, check out the Big Green Egg website--They were one of the first to popularize this style of barbecue. Amazing potential, with these things.

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Couple tips for barbecuing quickly: If you want coals with a quickness, use the exhaust port on a vacuum cleaner as a blower to get oxygen into the bottom of your chosen implement of barbecue destruction. Or, if you've got access to a charcoal "chimney", direct the airflow into the bottom. You'll have full-on coals most quickly, but be careful that you don't go too far, and convert your barbecue into a forge.

 

The other tip? If you haven't tried one of the Kamado-style barbecues, you're missing out. Think of a Weber, but with a clay body instead of metal. You can get the temps up high enough inside one to easily replicate a wood-fired pizza oven, and with some work, learn how to do that. I finally broke down and bought one from Costco, and the product is amazing. Steak done on one of these is incredible--You sear the hell out of the meat for about three minutes a side at 650-700 degrees, and then let the meat rest, and take it down to 350 to cook for about ten minutes. Amazing results--I managed to turn a cheap pair of top round steaks into something sublime, using this thing and a nice Balsamic marinade. I'm a Kamodo believer, now. If you want to make your mouth water, check out the Big Green Egg website--They were one of the first to popularize this style of barbecue. Amazing potential, with these things.

 

I have a big green egg that I bought last year, it's fantastic. I hardly used my oven all summer and most of the winter thanks to the egg, I bake bread in it, make pizzas, smoke meat and fish, high heat grill and also use it for low and slow cooking. They can be pricey but are well worth it if you enjoy cooking over charcoal.

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Amazing results--I managed to turn a cheap pair of top round steaks into something sublime, using this thing and a nice Balsamic marinade. I'm a Kamodo believer, now. If you want to make your mouth water, check out the Big Green Egg website--They were one of the first to popularize this style of barbecue. Amazing potential, with these things.

 

I mixed hamburger meat with balsamic vinegar and spices, and it was sublime. My favorite marinade.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have a big green egg that I bought last year, it's fantastic. I hardly used my oven all summer and most of the winter thanks to the egg, I bake bread in it, make pizzas, smoke meat and fish, high heat grill and also use it for low and slow cooking. They can be pricey but are well worth it if you enjoy cooking over charcoal.

I bought the Egg knock-off. Absolutely love it. The smoker part is easy, but cooking a steak with the grill at 650 only takes a couple of minutes and tastes yummy.

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Amazing results--I managed to turn a cheap pair of top round steaks into something sublime, using this thing and a nice Balsamic marinade. I'm a Kamodo believer, now. If you want to make your mouth water, check out the Big Green Egg website--They were one of the first to popularize this style of barbecue. Amazing potential, with these things.

 

I mixed hamburger meat with balsamic vinegar and spices, and it was sublime. My favorite marinade.

 

I love that...

 

Another nice recipe: Ground turkey, sun-dried tomatoes chopped up finely, Asiago cheese, and seasonings of your choice. I usually use Montreal steak seasoning. Just be sure to firmly compact the meat mixture into a patty, or it will fall apart on the grill.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Went to a wedding this evening and they served pulled pork and smoked chicken at the reception. The pulled pork was damn good, but I didnt care for the chicken. Served it with an absolutely excellent North Carolina mustard sauce. Rest of the selection was nothing to turn your nose up at either which is pretty rare for a wedding in my experience. Should of taken a picture of the caterers smoker set up. Must of been a $40,000 set up at least easy. It was a trailer with a very large smoker running the length of the right side, a middle size one on the rear, and a smaller one on the front, with the middle space being open enough for 3 guys to stand and work with plenty of elbow room.

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