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History of Soviet tanks


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4 hours ago, RETAC21 said:

The information there was gathered around 2000, with some data based on measurements but most of it were guesstimates and even published sources were not accurate. Much has been known since then, as documents have been declassified, but there's not a 100% accurate source for modern tanks for the reason Methos mentions here or in the other thread.

All Concerned -

 

That's fine.  That is why I wanted to check here and see if anyone had better answers.  So far, unfortunately, I have seen criticism but not much for real answers.

Do you recommend anywhere for sources?

Please advise.

 

Recommend,

 

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4 hours ago, RETAC21 said:

The information there was gathered around 2000, with some data based on measurements but most of it were guesstimates and even published sources were not accurate. Much has been known since then, as documents have been declassified, but there's not a 100% accurate source for modern tanks for the reason Methos mentions here or in the other thread.

 Real data is definitely not easy to find.

What do you recommend for more modern data for source material?

Please advise.

Respectfully,

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35 minutes ago, James_Leach said:

 Real data is definitely not easy to find.

What do you recommend for more modern data for source material?

Please advise.

Respectfully,

What you have been advised by Methos, use the search function and plenty of documents will turn up, go to the armor scientific forum and browse the contents.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well, not a tank, and not exactly soviet, but may fit here. BMP-1 (actually a VPV, chech ARV variant) engine/transmission installation at Mastermilo's workshop (the guy who restored a Type 69). Interesting to see the process, it is not an easy job. Also, the jungle of fuel/coolant/oil, etc. lines is clearly visible, the soviet (GOST) color code system is a massive help with repair and maintenance. Even modern car makers could learn from this! 

According to plans, this VPV will drive this week. The engine looks a bit worn outside, but actually, it was completely rebuilt last year. 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

"Mr Hewes" has a new T-72M to play with.

Ignore the comment about the 120mm gun - I think he'd run ahead of himself and misspoke (there is a caption calling himself out, so he does know better).

Some interesting "odds and ends" in the external stowage. They seem to have no idea what is supposed to be in there, but they did get some nice soft tanker's helmets and other bits and bobs.

 

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1st panel pulled out of storage box has and reminders about maximum temperature and pressure for oil and coolant (but that is my limit how much I can understand Czech).

He is right about pump being fuel transfer pump. Rest of what he says is like 90% incorrect, but at least he was honest to say he does not know a lot about T-72. :)

 

Edited by bojan
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40 minutes ago, bojan said:

but at least he was honest to say he does not know a lot about T-72. :)

Thats an understatement... He knows absolutely nothing about the drivetrain of the T-72. Also barely anything about the engine... "turbocharged"... good joke. Stopped watching after that. 

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17 hours ago, Bichri001 said:

What is that rectangular plate near the TC cupola(circled in red) added to the modernised T-44M roof? 

Wiki states that the T-44M  "received a mount for an antiaircraft machine gun" but I don't think this looks like it.

Thats an adapter part for the TVN-2 night vision device, used when driving head out. 

scale_2400

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That was also the case with the T-55. This is a sheet metal bracket that can be attached to the front of the hatch of the driver. The drivers night vision device is then installed behind it. This means the driver can easily see through his IR night vision device when the hatch open and seat in top position. Only God and the designer know why it is stored on top of the turret.

@

In the picture above you can see this in the second drawing from the left

Edited by Stefan Kotsch
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1 hour ago, Stefan Kotsch said:

Only God and the designer know why it is stored on top of the turret.

Funny thing, is that this is the only item on a T-54/55/62 that never had a proper place. It wandered around the turret constantly, depending on the year of manufacture and manufacturer. Rear turret, top turret, side of turret, it appeared in different places.

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  • 2 weeks later...

An interesting post from the Next-Generation Future channel on youtube; discussing various Russian AFV's which are being considered for use as remotely-operated combat vehicles; namely the BMP-3 and BMD-4M, however the modernised version of the Sprut airborne anti-tank gun is also mentioned.

Next-Generation Future channel; remotely operated Russian AFV's

When I first saw the text for this video, I was expecting to hear more about the URAN-9 (seems to have gone quiet as far as that design has concerned) but the news of the BMP-3 already being tested was quite a surprise to me.

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These remote-controlled BMP-3s were already reported in February 2023.

But I can't find any real meaning behind it. Ok, no one will be sitting in it if it gets destroyed. But the vulnerability remains unchanged and there is a risk that your IFV's will be thrown like 'pearls before swine'.  Here the remote control is expected to do something that it cannot do.

And in addition, the situational awareness of the remote operator is significantly poorer. Or so much modern electronics and optronics are installed that the exorbitant costs simply prohibit the use in one-way-ticket-action.

Edited by Stefan Kotsch
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On 12/11/2023 at 7:16 PM, old_goat said:

Thats an understatement... He knows absolutely nothing about the drivetrain of the T-72. Also barely anything about the engine... "turbocharged"... good joke. Stopped watching after that. 

Well... he did tear down a T34 engine and has started reassembling one. So the man clearly is not an idiot. He just knows considerably more about Chieftain and Centurion than T72, and he is pretty honest about that.

Basically its an interesting tour of the inside of a T72, Id leave it at that.

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Exactly, Stuart. I think he corrects himself on a few points later on in the video (like saying the gun is 120mm, and misidentifying something as being a turbocharger when it's something else.)

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I have to say, I really rather admire him. A few episodes back he was tearing down a Chieftains electronics box relating to the turret drive, and with someones help, he is always pretty honest about that,dismantled it and got  the turret rotating again.

Ok, so its lad culture. Not everyone likes the Top Gear style of presenting. But he really isnt a bullshitter, and he really does have some epic skills in his toolbox.No he isnt Manic. Not everyone can be.

Edited by Stuart Galbraith
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Looks like quite a collection at that museum! 👌I would imagine that a T-34/76 model 1941 would be a rare item by now and not many museums would have one?  Also nice to have both T-34's next to each other for comparison.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've seen a couple of videos where the turret of a hit T-90M starts to rotate 360°(it seem uncontrolled). Why is that happening? The crew seems to escape in these two specific cases, so I assume no dead gunner is leaning on Cheburashka. Is it a procedure to quickly scan the surroundings and engage potential threats to prevent more hits?

1- This one is very recent, the whole internet is talking about it, a battle between Bradley and a T-90M: https://youtu.be/_sdWmBDkAMs?si=LTftGPkqGhj8CQP- . This is the supposed aftermath: QL24vmP.jpg

 

This is an older video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DefBdgVyHac

 

Edited by Bichri001
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IIRC, wasnt there a system where if it gets locked up by a laser, the turret traverses  to face the emitter? Im just wondering if damage to that might make the thing keep rotating in search of a spurious emitter.

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6 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

IIRC, wasnt there a system where if it gets locked up by a laser, the turret traverses  to face the emitter? Im just wondering if damage to that might make the thing keep rotating in search of a spurious emitter.

Well I think that Shtora-1 APS has the ability to "lock" on the laser emitting targer and turn the turret in that direction(and even potentially automatically pop out smoke in that direction). http://www.kotsch88.de/al_shtora-1.htm

Edited by Bichri001
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So the T-72B3M obr.2022 and T-72BM (2023) TC supposedly recevies a new TKN-3TP with a thermal channel instead of the usual IR night channel. This device uses an uncooled microbolometric multi-element focal plane array. Resolution - 640x480. The thermal imager produces a black-and-white image with subsequent processing by digital means. The processed image is displayed on a miniature OLED display.

  1. If I understand correctly, the thermal channel/image can't be seen through the TKN oculars and only from the screen?
  2. Any photos of this new array?

 

 

Edited by Bichri001
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  • 2 weeks later...

Not new, but known faults of Tagil designed ERA installation –

UAF T-72B – 1 hit and 2 sections destroyed and all adjacent damaged - https://t.me/btvt2019/9277

Same for Russian AF T-72B – same story - https://t.me/btvt2019/9429

Illustration https://t.me/btvt2019/9430 The welds of the ribs welded to the tank hull nose plate have cuts made on both sides of the sides (ribs). The welded seams of the sides are shear welded.

Same situation during controll tests before - https://t.me/btvt2019/9431 in 2009/

And the same even before - https://t.me/btvt2019/9450

What cause this miserable survivability described here - https://btvtinfo.blogspot.com/2024/01/blog-post_22.html

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