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DougRichards

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About DougRichards

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    Doug Richards

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    Male
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    Looking at Tamarama Beach, Sydney, Aust
  • Interests
    Degree in History and Politics. Interests are Military History, military models,

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  1. I wonder if India and France would join the fun? France would probably side with the Chinese and attempt to blockade Portsmouth, again.
  2. Exactly what I was thinking: it isn't as if Australia, Japan, South Korea etc wouldn't get involved, with Taiwan as the 'unsinkable aircraft carrier' not so far away. To a lesser extent Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam etc would see that their interests are better served throwing their lot in with the anti-Chinese allies rather than waiting to be economically and strategically strangled by the PRC. Let us not forget the USN, USAF and USMC......
  3. The 'Gold Standard' was a curse for far too long. As long as more gold could be dug up and refined it was a moveable feast, not as if it actually meant anything in actual currency, even though it was used as such. Quoting https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/09/gold-standard.asp The gold standard is not currently used by any government. Britain stopped using the gold standard in 1931 and the U.S. followed suit in 1933 and abandoned the remnants of the system in 1973. So all that gold and no-where to go?
  4. Gold is just a metal, like any other metal, it has its uses, which are actually quite small. Modern day it is useful in electronics and jewellery, maybe dentistry. So really, what would Stalin do with all that gold if no one else in the world wanted to trade for it?
  5. Except 'once more into the breach dear friends' is a travesty where the 'dear leader' got out of military service due to a friendly doctors report. Life today would have been so much better if he had done his military service instead of using family connections to avoid it.
  6. Is it not time to leave the subject of Uncle Fester / Donald Trump alone and move on to the real world where Twitter Big Brother and a great number of two plus two equals three or even five, depending on what 'Big Brother Donald' says must be true (Covid 19 isn't dangerous, regardless of the science / medical evidence says?). Can we forgot the orange faced one for a while and move forward in the real world please?
  7. Didn't they have to lathe them down a little, taking care that the turning would not cause problems with the fuzes, as there were 'unsafed' by the spin imparted by firing in a rifled barrel?
  8. But see: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/drop-penny-off-empire-state-building-2015-12?r=US&IR=T Now that is a US 'penny', a small one cent coin. It weighs 2.5 grams. A British penny was 9.4 grams (same as an Australian penny of the same era). A British decimal penny is much less lethal from a height than the old penny, being only 3.6 grams. So it seems that if the fragments of a shell were around 2.5 grams it may have stung a bit, but anything heavier may have been problematic. Hence the use of Tube stations as air raid shelters. A direct hit from a 250kg German
  9. British heavy AA was, during the Blitz, time fuzed and not contact fuzed. Lighter AA, such as 40mm Bofors and 2pdrPom Poms were contact fuzed but had a self destruct, usually linked to the tracer, but the Bofors self destruct was between 3,400 and 5,500 yards. It isn't as if the self destruct would reduce the shell to something resembling talc falling from the sky, more like a collection of nail heads, that would have been slowed significantly by atmospheric friction. Even so, at low angles I would not like to be in a position in line at 5,600 yards from the gun when the shell self destruct
  10. Indeed the number of US (and other) weapons that fired the 75mm shell, in its various incarnations, are legion. The M1 75mm Howitzer fired the same shell but with a lessened charge in the case, but still adequate so that in one instance when the USMC tankers ran out of 75mm rounds for their M4 Shermans they were able to fire 75mm Howitzer ammunition, of course at lower velocities and ranges, but I doubt that the Japanese occupants of bunkers being hit by a 75mm howitzer round fired from a Sherman at a range of around 200 metres would have paused and thought about the difference. The M1 7
  11. And they looked older, I mean photos from before 1950 that show 25 years olds who would pass for 40 year olds now.
  12. Only that it fired the same ammunition (sort of - AP was not one of the usual shells of the 1897, well not until well after 1897.....\]
  13. Interesting question that we may never be able to answer as British bookkeeping may have been deficient in late 1940 when the US sold a large number of 75mm guns to the British. One version was known as the Ord, QF 75mm Converted Mk 1, which was the US 75mm Gun M1917. This was at a time that anything that could shoot reasonably was taken in, and many had their carriage cut away and used as beach defence guns, which really freed up what the British had already, ie the 18pdr gun, for field duties or conversions to 18/25pdrs. Whilst vaguely possible that some of the US M1917 guns (hav
  14. M1897 A4 Muzzle rollers removed and replaced by steel rails and bronze strips. The M1897 A2 appears to have the rollers or similar fitting about a quarter of the barrel length from the muzzle. It is likely that other 'variants' of this gun were not really variants but new designs that shared only the ammunition and general principles with the original weapon. for instance the 75mm Gun M1917 was actually the British 18pdr relined to 75mm and chambered for the "French' round.
  15. Hogg notes that the 75mm Gun 1897: "Because of the long recoil movement (which the gun had pioneered) the muzzle carried a reinforcing band with two rollers beneath it: these engaged in the cradle slides during the later part of the recoil stroke, and supported the gun in alignment with the cradle. Without these the breech would have sagged down at the end of the recoil stroke and the cradle guides would have been strained and deformed."
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