Jump to content

ickysdad

Members
  • Posts

    827
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About ickysdad

  • Birthday 11/12/1958

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Tell City,Indiana
  • Interests
    My kids,military history and women in that order...

Recent Profile Visitors

387 profile views

ickysdad's Achievements

Crew

Crew (2/3)

0

Reputation

  1. I was kind of hoping some could shed some light on this statement.....or provide a good source on Sheridan's expedition post civil war tp Texas/Mexico... quote..." This caused the French, who were already committed to withdrawing support for Max, to change their minds and reinstate support. The hamfisted diplomacy of the US looked like bullying, and no great power can be seen to be publically bullied by a regional power. The French in fact retrenched after the US tried to bluff them, and reinforced their expeditionary forces. The US, with their bluff called, disbanded the mutinous volunteers sent to Mexico who had not signed on for fighting the French and saw no morale obligation to do so. The US sent Sheridan to the border with the all-African-American 25th Corps, whose terms of enlistment meant they had no right to be discharged, the 4th Corps and Merritt's and Custer's divisions from the AoP. Some regiments actually mutinied, such as the 31st Indiana who had to be disarmed by the 77th Pennsylvania at gunpoint when ordered to New Orleans. Merritt's division invaded Texas with only 6 regiments (1st La, 2nd Ill, 2nd NJ, 18th NY, 10th Ill and 3rd/4th Mich Cav), and Custer's with 5 regiments (6th Ind, 1st Ia, 5th Ill, 12th Ill and 2nd Wisc Cav). It is known that the 3rd/4th Michigan Cavalry mutinied in Texas. The CO of the 1st Iowa Cavalry threatened to shoot Custer. They were very unhappy. They were to be supported by 4th and 25th Corps, but as we've said, 4th Corps was disintegrating. Those regiments that didn't mutiny took their discharge dates very seriously, and although they were ca. 10,000 PFD when ordered to Texas only ca. 5,000 PFD arrived. On 20th September Sheridan reported he'd discharged a large number and now had 2,000 white troops (rump of 4th Corps) and 10,000 colored troops (rump of 25th Corps) along the border. The French did not give an order to withdraw their troops from Mexico until 1st May 1866. By this time the entire US force along the border was roughly a brigade."...end quote
  2. quote...." ickysdad said: ↑ I have a hard time believing that any of the European armies beats Lee(per Gettysburg) because they are simply too offensive-minded with the possible exception of the Austrians. Rather than dig in on the high ground above Gettysburg they probably go on the attack, exposing their flanks in the open. If the Europeans follow Meade's strategy, they probably win the battle. Then hell we have in Pennsylvania, Union commander Buford stumbles across an advance corps of an Austrian, French or Prussian expeditionary force. A battle ensues. Again, if the European army is the same size as the ANV and just as offensive-minded, they probably fail to carry Meade's position. Then they may not hold together after Pickett's charge and fall to a charge by Custer!!!!!!... then a comment like this from guess who responds to my post above....lolquote...."f you teleport a British Army to Gettysburg there is no need to assault. The Federal battle line is within easy rifle range of Peach Orchard Ridge (where the rebel guns were lined up). The British will simply shoot down the defenders and walk over the corpses"....end quote.... Nice little website here but has become infected....https://civilwartalk.com/threads/how-can-the-union-and-confederate-armies-compare-to-the-armies-of-europe.141370/
  3. Then per the US threat against France per their occupation in Mexico post civil war>>> quote..." This caused the French, who were already committed to withdrawing support for Max, to change their minds and reinstate support. The hamfisted diplomacy of the US looked like bullying, and no great power can be seen to be publically bullied by a regional power. The French in fact retrenched after the US tried to bluff them, and reinforced their expeditionary forces. The US, with their bluff called, disbanded the mutinous volunteers sent to Mexico who had not signed on for fighting the French and saw no morale obligation to do so. The US sent Sheridan to the border with the all-African-American 25th Corps, whose terms of enlistment meant they had no right to be discharged, the 4th Corps and Merritt's and Custer's divisions from the AoP. Some regiments actually mutinied, such as the 31st Indiana who had to be disarmed by the 77th Pennsylvania at gunpoint when ordered to New Orleans. Merritt's division invaded Texas with only 6 regiments (1st La, 2nd Ill, 2nd NJ, 18th NY, 10th Ill and 3rd/4th Mich Cav), and Custer's with 5 regiments (6th Ind, 1st Ia, 5th Ill, 12th Ill and 2nd Wisc Cav). It is known that the 3rd/4th Michigan Cavalry mutinied in Texas. The CO of the 1st Iowa Cavalry threatened to shoot Custer. They were very unhappy. They were to be supported by 4th and 25th Corps, but as we've said, 4th Corps was disintegrating. Those regiments that didn't mutiny took their discharge dates very seriously, and although they were ca. 10,000 PFD when ordered to Texas only ca. 5,000 PFD arrived. On 20th September Sheridan reported he'd discharged a large number and now had 2,000 white troops (rump of 4th Corps) and 10,000 colored troops (rump of 25th Corps) along the border. The French did not give an order to withdraw their troops from Mexico until 1st May 1866. By this time the entire US force along the border was roughly a brigade."...end quote
  4. some more babble from elsewhere....I was told artillery was so accurate it could dislodge even the best entrenchments at over 2,000 yards.... "The performance of smoothbore artillery against the skillfully evolved Maori fortification system encountered during the 1845-46 campaign had not been impressive. (3) not only field guns but even a ship's 32-pr. At Ruapekapeka a much more imposing array of ordnance - three naval 32-prs, an 18-pr, two 12-pr howitzers, a 6-pr gun, plus four mortars and two rockets managed to make a breach, but only after bombardment lasting the best part of a day. Thus the arrival of the new rifled guns was awaited with great interest." "They then went on to say that the rua, as the Maori called his rifle pits, were constructed to provide overhead cover from the spherical shell hitherto fired at them. First a narrow trench was made, then on the side nearer the pakeha, it was dug out somewhat in the shape of a shoe, the earth so removed being thrown to the top rear upon rough wooden beams placed there to support it. The Maori only showed themselves to deliver their fire - they then smartly retired inside the rua. (8) fired three or four feet (about 1m) below the top of the excavated earth would penetrate the pits and burst inside. He then returned to the gun position to put his ideas into effect." "Prior to 15 March the following smooth-bore ordnance had been deployed against Te Arei: two 8-in Naval guns, four 4.4 Coehorn mortars, one 9-pr field gun, and two 24-pr howitzers. With the Armstrongs came four more mortars, two 8-in and two 10-in. The 8-in gun and the mortars fired common shell only, the 9-pr fired shot, case and shrapnel, and the 24-prs common shell, case and shrapnel. When it is remembered the Maori had nothing comparable with which to retaliate the firepower he faced was formidable indeed, but it had failed to dislodge him. Exploding shells merely made holes in the earth of his overhead cover which could be easily repaired. Fragments rarely penetrated into the rua and caused few casualties. (14) at night did not shake him although he found it extremely objectionable - he considered it quite unchivalrous because it upset his repair programme! But the 12-prs sought him out in the very places he thought safe; they were the 'last straw', the ultimate cause of his surrender" 'The guns were loaded and laid, and the gunners with lanyard in hand waited for the word from the officer, who was watching until some heads appeared above in that direction, or a puff of smoke revealed their presence, when the gun was instantly fired, and the shell, entering just below the crest of their pits, burst inside. 'The following evidence has been given concerning the action of the Armstrong shell with the concussion fuze (i.e., percussion fuze) only:- Colour-Serjeant J. Morant, Royal Engineers, was at the head of the sap, and saw an Armstrong shell go through a rifle pit, about four feet of earth, and burst inside, and heard the enemy shout as in pain; he also observed that the shell from the Armstrong gun entered the rifle pits as soon or sooner than the report was heard, so that the natives had not time to get out of the way. Bomber J. Singer, No. 3 Battery, 12th Brigade RA, was at the head of the sap, and in the advance parallel with the Coehorn mortars, when he saw several shell from the Armstrong gun go through the enemy's rifle pits and burst inside. After the cessation of hostilities one of the natives told my sergeant-major that they were sometimes able to get out of the way of the mortar or large shells, but never out of the way of the shell (whether with time or concussion, or concussion fuze only) from the gun "all the same as the rifle," meaning the Armstrong guns, as the shell was amongst them as soon as they heard the report. These natives have designated the Armstrong shell "the quick shell". 'The different statements made both by those who were in the sap as well as by the natives themselves corroborate the observations taken from the battery, viz., that the Armstrong shell only entered the crest of the enemy's rifle pits and burst inside; whether there were few or many natives in the pit at the time cannot be ascertained.' Franco-Prussian war: Hohenlohe's letters describe in great detail how: before the war between France and Austria had come to an end, orders had been given to construct, as a beginning, 300 rifled 6-pr. field guns... The results obtained from these guns were indeed astonishing to any one who had until then seen only S.B. guns fired... the greatest range was only from 1800 to 2000 paces. At greater distances there was no danger from S.B. field guns. Now suddenly a gun was seen, which could hit the target at a still greater range, and of which the shell burst on striking the mark with such destructive effect, that it seemed doubtful whether any enemy could stand against such a missile. Or, when describing his own part in the action of Koniggratz: The first trial shots gave the range as 4000 paces; we were then much too far from the enemy, and I advanced my guns nearer to him... The range was then 1900 paces; we therefore engaged the enemy... altogether 90 guns were firing on the target. Or describing the action at St Privat: our fire, which was delivered up a slope, at a range of from 2000 to 3000 paces... his complete silence and the retrograde movements which he could be seen making from Roncourt to Saint-Privat proved that he felt the superiority of our fire.... A trial shot was fired at 1700 paces range; this was to show us the point up to which we should let them advance before reopening the rapid fire... three [infantry attacks] were made, but the two last were not carried out with the same energy as the first. They were stopped at about 1500 paces in front of our line. Or at Sedan: With elevation for a little more than 4000 paces we appeared to hit. I considered that the range was too great for the fire to have any effect, and I was about to order it to cease, when an evident disturbance in the ranks of the enemy proved that our projectiles had reached him. We continued then to fire slowly at this moving target as long as it remained visible... On the following day Lieutenant von Kaas, while doing duty as aide-de-camp, passed by this point, and found on a narrow crest which ran between very steep ravines, an entire French battery which had been abandoned there. The team of the leading gun had been blown to pieces by our shells, and the other guns could not pass it ; thus the whole battery fell into our hands, a trophy of the accuracy of our fire. Or at Chilliers-aux-Bois: I took advantage of the opportunity, and pushed my artillery across the railway embankment by successive batteries; we approached Chilleurs-aux-Bois to within a range of 2000 paces, and set to work to bombard the village. The enemy did not wait for our infantry to deliver a decisive attack upon them, but very soon commenced to abandon the village, and to retire towards the forest of Orleans. During this retreat one of the enemy's columns was fired on with so much success that it broke up and disbanded itself.
  5. No I'm not you guys are actually backing up my man points,i.e. one can't actually state using means at hands in 1860's-1870's that 50lbs of British powder equals 60 lbs of US powder....OR measure velocity with any precise means of measurement. Thanks Guys !!!!!!
  6. In James G. Benton's "A Course Of Instruction In Ordnanace And Gunnery Prepared For The Use Of The Cadets Of The United States Military Academy" on page 524 it shows with a 40 lb charge an initial MV of 1028 FPS(based on US tests) whereas what the British tests Tiger sources show 921 FPS on just 35 lb charge. On a 60lb charge of American powder it shows 1069 FPS IV(and just above that it lists 1121 FPS IV with 50lbs of American powder????) FPS IV but US tests showed 1191 FPS. Also Tigger's linked document if you notice doesn't even list the Initial velocity for higher charges above 50lbs of British powder. On the June 7 reading of Trigger's document it shows 3 shots at 1069 FPS IV whilst on July 24 it shows 1174,1172 and 1134 FPS IV ,all at 60lbs American powder. and too further buttress my claim that the books might have been cooked per the British tests in a US test in Washington Naval Yard a 15" Rodman using 60lbs of powder threw a (though a 400 lb versus 453 lb one) projectile at like 1480 FPS IV. I got this info from "A Treatsie On Ordnance And Armor" by Alexander Lyman Holley. plus read bottoms of pages 139-141 in the following link it tells of British tests showing a 15" Rodman throwing 440 lb projectile at like 1320 FPS IV and seems to say British powder really isn't any better then American powder though I maybe mis-understanding the article... https://books.google.com/books?id=K...nauthor:norton&source=gbs_book_other_versions However it seems as most of you are saying small and even large variances can occur even between tests in the same country much less between two countries testing the same weapon...
  7. here is the problem I have with the linked document above...... In James G. Benton's "A Course Of Instruction In Ordnanace And Gunnery Prepared For The Use Of The Cadets Of The United States Military Academy" on page 524 it shows with a 40 lb charge an initial MV of 1028 FPS(based on US tests) whereas what the British tests Tiger sources show 921 FPS on just 35 lb charge. On a 60lb charge of American powder it shows 1069 FPS IV(and just above that is shows 1121 FPS IV with 50lbs of American powder????) FPS but US tests showed 1191 FPS IV. Also Tigger's linked document if you notice doesn't even list the Initial velocity for higher charges above 50lbs of British powder. It also leaves out the IV of British charges over 50 lbs but states 83 lbs of British powder is equal to 100 lbs of American mammoth powder... On the June 7 reading of Trigger's document it shows 3 shots at 1069 FPS IV whilst on July 24 it shows 1174,1172 and 1134 FPS IV ,all at 60lbs American powder.
  8. Well someone posted this on another forum saying it shows just how superior British powder was to American powder...What are thoughts? It seems to say that 83 lbs of British powder was superior to 100lbs of American Mammoth powd http://warships1discussionboards.yuku.com/sreply/570132/Warrior-vs-Defence-four-times-the-bang-for-one-third-more
  9. Do you have Rob Lundgren's book? it's a pretty good read on the issue. He used and provided a far more detailed report then the one you linked to . http://warships1discussionboards.yuku.com/topic/25981/The-World-Wonderd-What-Really-Happened-Off-Samar?page=1#.WWW9xYWcEdU
  10. Yamato may have hit White Plains with a diving type projectile..... http://warships1discussionboards.yuku.com/topic/25981/The-World-Wonderd-What-Really-Happened-Off-Samar?page=1#.WWW9xYWcEdU
  11. maybe they controlled resources around the world because they had such a large economy? I don't see that as pillage and plunder....In fact all that pillage and plunder you cite also rebuilt Europe and Japan...
  12. was the 85 mm gun ready a year earlier? I thought the gun itself wasn't really ready till like spring of 1943? Just looking for info guys and thanks so much for info so far...
  13. I've heard it discussed elsewhere that the T-34 was up gunned from the 76mm to the 85mm because of a need to have a more powerful HE shell to deal with infantry,artillery & AT guns rather then a need for more AP power to deal with the emergence of Tigers & Panthers. So what's the answer? Any good sources on the matter?
  14. I have recently received the reprint about the Stuart ,I find it to be an excellent book and the photographs aren't bad at all. I also just recently ordered the Hunnicutt book about the M1 Abrams...
×
×
  • Create New...