Jump to content

TrustMe

Members
  • Posts

    206
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Definitely not from Liverpool, England :D
  • Interests
    Computers, Post WW2 Military History, Sci Fi Books

Recent Profile Visitors

221 profile views

TrustMe's Achievements

Crew

Crew (2/3)

0

Reputation

  1. Bojan is right. Pre 1979 Iran supported Israel with oil in return Imperial Iranian Airforce pilots received combat training in Iran from Israeli pilots. It's one of the reasons why Iran dominated Iraq in the air for the first two years of the Iran - Iraq war.
  2. The J10 was based on the Israeli IAI Lavi prototypes which never went into production. But it's technology was apparently sold by Israel to the Chinese. It's rumoured that there is a clause in the sale stating that the J10 / Lavi cannot be sold to a third party hence no exports.
  3. Maybe it has a helmet linked to multiple camera's around the aircraft that allow the pilot to see through the structure of the aircraft just like on the F35.
  4. That picture looks like its a father and son together 😀 ...there's not as many aircraft available as once had been, you want them to be as capable as possible... Ever since the end of the cold war a lot of the single role fighters have left service due to cut backs so you are quite right. The RAF lost the Jaguar, Sea Harrier, Harrier and then Tornado just recently. Things have gone multi-role to reduce costs with even such fighters as the Eurofighter going swing role in Syria. But, having to train pilots for all the different roles that a multi role jet can do makes them a jack of all trades rather than a master at none. In my opinion it's stupid. But I doubt it will change. ...For an interceptor, you don't need stealth. For a strike platform, as long as you have long range munitions, you dont need stealth... I agree completely. Given the massively different 'stand off' munitions in service in different countries a non stealth jet can always fight at ranges outside that of enemy fighters. At least that's the theory of things. If you look at say Israel, they can launch missiles at targets in Syria (which they do regularly) without even leaving Israeli air space. Now that's something 😀
  5. The F16 and MIG23 are roughly around in the same weight class. As for the modern F16, it is the cheapest western fighter currently in production and one of the most capable.
  6. There's a direct relationship between weight of an aircraft and it's cost. With the Rafale, France really wanted a single engine fighter just like the Mirage 2000 so as to remain cost effective in the export market. But the inability of the French aero industry to create a single high performance engine with enough thrust to power the Rafale meant that they had to have two engines. If you look at the F16 it was originally created as a day only, highly maneuverable and cheap fighter aircraft. That it's evolved into something radically different over the last 40+ years and yet still low cost is amazing. In short light aircraft are highly desirable due to their low cost over their overall lifespan. However the fact is that the Russians haven't built a light fighter since the MIG23. Let's hope the new fighter works better than that.
  7. Maybe both sides remember the 1960's border clashes between the two sides. But, I think KV7 is right, with Russian know how and Chinese money they can both go far. The Chinese WZ10 attack chopper was designed by Russian design house Kamov using Chinese money. The Chinese space program benefits from Russian know how as well.
  8. The Germans still have 78 Leopard2 A4's in store.
  9. The Chinese have there own Stealth fighter the J20 so I don't think the Su57 would ever be sold to it. They also make copied of the Su27/30, the J10 and the JF17 (for export only). But China has bought 24 Su35's, so that China can take them apart to study and then improve their own J11 series jets. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chengdu_J-20 China has a problem in it's ability to produce jet engine's. There track record is rather poor, for example the new JF17 is powered by the Klimov RD-33 turbofan engine which originally powered the MIG29.
  10. The Mikholt is an Israel air to surface weapon dropped from a Hermes 450 ( I don't know of other Israeli UAV's can use it). Spike NLOS is an Israeli manufactured anti tank weapon. It may have parts from non-Israeli sources like Iron Dome but i'm not 100% sure.
  11. I'm not sure of this is the right place to post this but here goes. This is a question for our American cousins... I was having an argument in the pub last week about that, in the US you can walk into any Walmart and buy a AR15 but you can't buy a bullet proof vest. Apparently only law enforcement personnel can use them for civilians its illegal. Is this true?
  12. I don't have a link, it's a paper magazine. Low tech or what 😀
  13. In the latest issue of Airforce Monthly, it covers the munitions that Israel dropped. They dropped over 1500 of them... JDAM, Small Diameter Bomb, Hellfire, Spike Non Line of Sight BLU 109/117 bunker busters, Spice 2000 and Mikholt. After the war Israel ordered $735 million of new munitions from the US.
  14. With Russia building the heavy Su57, I always thought the Russians had shot themselves in the foot. The Su57 was simply too expensive for the export market, whilst at the same time Russia needed a heavy stealth aircraft to try to gain parity with the American F22. Now we have the answer.
×
×
  • Create New...