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2805662

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  1. There was a shooting incident in Darwin, Australia earlier this year. The gunman had an ankle bracelet fitted throughout his spree. What isnt too widely known is that the audit of GPS data occurs at the end of each month. It is nowhere near real time. I reckon public acceptance of ankle bracelets to monitor parolees etc. would be a lot lower if that fact was more widely known.
  2. In Australian mobility trials (hot/dry, hot/wet) both Boxer & AMV out-performed ASLAV (lighter than a Stryker). Both could go where the ASLAV would get stuck & need recovery.
  3. The SIG MCX-Spears barrel is less than 16 and achieves the required muzzle velocity. Maybe it has more to do with what pressures the polymer cartridge cases can/cannot handle.
  4. Like I said, it depends on the user. The ones Ive worked with have it as a general issue (handed to everyone) if the threat requires it.
  5. This is what M995 can do. https://i.imgur.com/cec8UNB.jpg https://i.imgur.com/cec8UNB.jpg Depending on users, its a special purpose round, but not a round for specialists. If the threat requires the use of AP, everyone gets it.
  6. M995 is the 5.56mm armour piercing round with a tungsten carbide penetrator. Compared with M855 and M855A1, its performance is very good. Expensive, though. Would like to compare M856 with M856A1, though.
  7. Would not be the first time for Australia. The RAN replaced the Gannet (turbo-prop etc) with a piston engined aircraft that had first flown before the Gannet - the Grumman Tracker. As weird ways as autralian procurements go sometimes I would not be too surprised when they decide to replace their Tigers with other Tigers. Thats certainly what Airbus are pushing. Hopefully saner heads will prevail. Theres a lot to be said for buying a platform thats either part of a larger, standardised global fleet, or is at least operated by a major partner with a history of long-term investment in their
  8. Lesson learned from Stark: if you have Phalanx, turn it on. Or not, in the presence of friendlies: https://www.nytimes.com/1996/06/05/world/japanese-down-navy-plane-in-an-accident-crew-is-safe.html Perhaps they shouldve called it the Claymore?
  9. Lesson learned from Stark: if you have Phalanx, turn it on.
  10. I think you mean Narva river - border river between towns of Narva (Estonia) and Ivangorod (Russia). Neva river is in StPeterburgOr did he?
  11. Also, the warhead on the Stark did not detonate. Modern opinion is, the war head on the Sheffields Exocet in fact did. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Sheffield_(D80) The initial Ministry of Defence (MOD) Board of Inquiry on the sinking of Sheffield concluded that, based upon available evidence, the warhead did not detonate.[17] However, some of the crew and members of the task force believed that the missile's 165 kilograms (364 lb) warhead had detonated.[12] This was supported by a MOD re-assessment of the loss of Sheffield, which reported in summer 2015. In a paper delivered to the RINA W
  12. Agree on the differences in environmental conditions, but its worth looking a bit deeper into some other stats. Stark had 21% of its nominal complement killed (37 of 176), with a further 12% injured. According to para 2.5 of the JAG report (https://www.jag.navy.mil/library/investigations/USS%20STARK%20BASIC.pdf), the second Exocet (which detonated) severed a fire main junction, disabling the port fire main. Sheffield had 7% of its complement killed (20 of 287). Damage to the fire main is absolutely unlucky. Im not saying one crew is better than the other, just that the smaller of the
  13. The US is famously good at damage control - to the point that the RN sent people to be trained by the USN in damage control post-Falklands war. Look at the difference in outcome between Sheffield and Stark. Sheffield, a Type 42 destroyer displacing almost 5,000 tonnes, is hit by a single Argentinian-fired Exocet and is lost. Stark, an Oliver Hazard Perry frigate displacing 4,100 tonnes, absorbs two Iraqi-fired Exocets and survives.
  14. They certainly send the parts by air freight. This means the delay is maybe ten hours more than for operators in Europe. Security may be an issue, but transportation in itself shouldn't be one. Youre getting from Europe to Australia in ten hours? The fastest civil flight time from Paris to Brisbane, with a single stop, is 25 hours. No, but guess what? Europeans don't exactly teleport their broken parts to the manufacturers, either. And other similar helicopters are similarly far away from their respective factories. Quite. Reinforces the ridiculousness of the statement. Spares availabilit
  15. They certainly send the parts by air freight. This means the delay is maybe ten hours more than for operators in Europe. Security may be an issue, but transportation in itself shouldn't be one. Youre getting from Europe to Australia in ten hours? The fastest civil flight time from Paris to Brisbane, with a single stop, is 25 hours.
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